• Richard Parrish

A Change of View

Updated: Jul 21


Sometimes you need a change of view.


In the last four months, I’ve stayed at home.


Beyond my once-a-week trip to the grocery store and a one-time outing to view our ministries’ new building project’s progress, my view has been the inside of my home and back yard.


I enjoy my home, and I am thankful for my home office. I’m blessed to have a space that allows me to write, produce video teachings, and continue to offer spiritual direction to pastors and leaders, via Zoom.


My early morning frequently finds me sitting on our back patio, mesmerized by the beauty of grateful hummingbirds who enjoy the sweet elixir from bright colored feeders.


Watching my two dogs, George and Gracie, chase lizards and guard their yard from intruding rabbits, brings a smile. Occasionally, I have to remind them: NO! These bunnies are not your chew toy!


Don’t misunderstand me. I enjoy my surroundings, but even this “homebody” recognizes the value of a change of scenery.


As beautiful as my desert surroundings are, a change of view has a way of refreshing the soul.


Lately, I’ve been thinking of how the souls of people are heavy because of everything we’re seeing in the media. Violence, hatred, divisiveness, self-centeredness, lack of respect, blame, abuse, greed, and name-calling, are just some of the ugliness we’re exposed to on a daily basis.


Perhaps we need a change of view.


In poetic form, the Psalmist expresses that when we need help, it’s essential to change our view.

“I lift up my eyes to the hills. From where does my help come? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth.[1]

“To lift up one’s eyes,” means in English, “to look up at.” That’s a great question for those weary of what we are seeing in our world today.


Who are you looking toward for help?


I appreciate our politicians, social workers, healthcare providers, law enforcement officers, and all who work unceasingly to change our world for the better. I pray for them daily—and will continue to do so.


But if I’m expecting them to transform hate, violence, self-centeredness, corruption, disregard of others, callousness, and strife, I need a change of view.


The Psalmist understands where our help comes from: The LORD, who made heaven and earth.”


All the good our leaders can do, all the compassion our health-givers and social workers offer, all the commitment our law enforcement officers have to keep us safe is appreciated. But it never will be enough.


Only God can reconcile us to Him and transform our hearts. The Psalmist also reminds us:

“Put not your trust in princes, in a son of man, in whom there is no salvation.[2]

Each of us needs a change of view.


I’m ready for a trip to the ocean, where the sound of the surf and the sea breeze calms and refreshes my body, soul, and mind.


But more importantly, I need to adjust my view to remember where my help comes from: “The LORD, who made the heavens and earth.”

[1] The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2016), Ps 121:1–2.

[2]The Holy Bible: English Standard Version (Wheaton, IL: Crossway Bibles, 2016), Ps 146:3.