• Richard Parrish

Word and Heart Alignment


My opinions tend to shape my words. And, when my sentiments are compelling, others – and my self – will benefit if I have a filter to process my words before they leave my lips!


James counsels us: “…let everyone be quick to listen, slow to speak, slow to anger; for your anger does not produce God’s righteousness.” [1]


Can you recall a time when you spoke before you listened only to realize later how your words inflicted harm to others? Unfortunately, I do.


Social media rhetoric surrounding the Senate hearings with Judge Kavanaugh and the testimony of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford is a fresh example of how opinionated words could use a filter.


Despite your view surrounding the accusations, qualifications, or political alignment, it’s difficult not to see how polarizing and destructive unfiltered words are!


Trusting my heart sounds authentic, noble, courageous, and – well, the right thing to do. But is my heart always true? Here’s what I know about myself:

I’m not always right. There are times when – as sincere as I believe I am – I discover that there may be ulterior motives; selfish preferences, hidden agendas of which I’m unaware.

The Psalmist prays: “Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable to you, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.” [2]


His prayer is a reminder that when my words and heart are in alignment with God’s opinion, I’m much more apt to build bridges than alienate others.


Today, I’m reminded of the importance that what I speak and what I think will be much more effective if I filter my words and heart through God’s outlook.


Lord, let my words and thoughts, be pleasing and acceptable to you!



[1] The Holy Bible: New Revised Standard Version (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1989), Jas 1:19–20.

[2] The Holy Bible: New Revised Standard Version (Nashville: Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1989), Ps 19:14.